Archive for the ‘education’ Category

Call Optiminds for Credit Recovery Programs for Students

April 23, 2014

If your student has failed courses because of poor grades or absenteeism or dropped out of school, there is hope for getting them back on track.

Optiminds now offers accredited, individualized credit recovery programs for students. Credit recovery is the process of helping students recover the credits they have lost so that they can move on to the next grade and stay in school and graduate on time.

Our customized credit recovery sessions focus on helping students boost achievement levels, earn credit based on competency of the content standards for a particular course and gain the skills they need to succeed. After an initial assessment, they receive the intensive instructional support they need to master core subjects.

Please give us a call at (248) 496-0150 for more information. Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

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Optiminds Adds Two New Counselors

February 16, 2014

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds is pleased to introduce our two newest counselors, who will be handling the new areas of focus we are offering in our College Counseling Division.

Aaron Fields is heading up the Athletic College Prep counseling area and will be responsible for the NCAA Clearinghouse portion of our college counseling division. He will be working to help athletes meet NCAA standards in order to continue with their playing careers. A former Division 1 baseball player, Aaron played professional baseball for a couple of years after graduating from college.

Aaron is dedicated to using his experience and training to help young athletes be prepared for college and the NCAA Clearinghouse requirements.

For more information about Optiminds’ athletic college prep counseling program, please call Aaron at (313) 590-4788, or email him at: afields@optimindsct.com.

Holly Markiecki-Bennetts is heading up the College Prep counseling area. She has spent the past 20 years working with high school and college students, and enjoys serving as a guide for students and their families in finding the right post-high school options.  Holly holds two Masters degrees—one in Higher Education Administration and one in School Counseling.

To find out more about Optiminds’ college prep counseling, please call Holly at (313) 478-3319 or email her at:  hbennetts@optimindsct.com.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

Optiminds Announces New Focus Areas in 2014

February 9, 2014

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds is pleased to be introducing two new areas of focus in our College Counseling Division beginning January 2014. The new focus areas are: College Prep and Athletic College Prep. We will be offering Parent/Student Workshops in both areas.

The College Prep Counseling Workshops will include:

  • How to find the right colleges
  • Essay writing
  • Resume writing
  • Applications
  • Organizational tools
  • Individual Sessions

For more information, call Holly Bennetts at (313) 478-3319, or email Holly at: hbennetts@optimindsct.com.

The Athletic College Prep Counseling Workshops will cover:

  • Athletics—High school and beyond
  • The recruiting process
  • NCAA eligibility (National Collegiate Athletic Association)
  • NAIA eligibility (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics)
  • Course planning
  • Individual Sessions

For more information, call Aaron Fields at (313) 590-4788 or email Aaron at: afields@optimindsct.com.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

Get ACT Test Preparation at Optiminds

January 16, 2014

ACTtest1The ACT is a national college admissions examination that is used as a college admissions and placement test and measures the skills and knowledge needed for first-year college success. Additionally, the ACT includes a career exploration component that stimulates students’ thinking about future plans and relates personal characteristics to career options.

What is the difference between the ACT and SAT?

The ACT is an achievement test, measuring what a student has learned in school. The SAT is more of an aptitude test, testing reasoning and verbal abilities. (See our January 9, 2014 post.) The ACT has up to 5 components—English, Mathematics, Reading, Science and an optional Writing Test. (You take the ACT Writing Test only if required by the college(s) you’re applying to.) The SAT has 3 components—Critical Reasoning, Mathematics, and a required Writing Test.

The SAT has a correction for guessing. That is, they take off for wrong answers. The ACT is scored based on the number of correct answers with no penalty for guessing.

The ACT has an Interest Inventory that allows students to evaluate their interests in various career options.

Upcoming ACT testing dates for 2014 are: February 8, April 12 and June 14. Optiminds’ ACT Testing Help and ACT Prep Classes are forming now.  Call our office at (248) 496-0150 for more information.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds by visiting our website at: optimindsct.com.

Optiminds Can Prepare You for SAT Testing

January 9, 2014

If you are a high school student, you will inevitably hear about SAT tests at some point. Most students take the SAT during their junior or senior year of high school, and almost all colleges and universities use the SAT to make admission decisions.

The SAT is the nation’s most widely used college admission test, and the first step toward higher education for students of all backgrounds. It gives both you and colleges a sense of how you’ll be able to apply the thinking, writing and study skills required for college course work. More than just a test, the SAT also provides the opportunity for you to connect to scholarship opportunities, place out of certain college courses and learn more about your academic strengths.

The SAT doesn’t test logic or abstract reasoning but rather tests what you already know—the reading, writing and math skills that you learn in school and that are critical for success in college and beyond.

More specifically:

  • The critical reading section includes reading passages and sentence completions
  • The writing section includes a short essay and multiple-choice questions on identifying errors and improving grammar and usage
  • The mathematics section includes questions on arithmetic operations, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability

The SAT is taken by more than two million students every year and is accepted by virtually all colleges and universities. It is offered seven times each year in the U.S.—in January, March, May, June, October, November and December. Upcoming dates are: Jan 25, March 8, May 3 and June 7.

At least half of all students take the SAT twice — in the spring as a junior and in the fall as a senior. Most students improve their score the second time they take the SAT.

Optiminds can help you prepare for the SAT. Call our office at (248) 496-0150 to find out more about our SAT Preparation sessions. Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds by visiting our website at: optimindsct.com.

Girls Are As Good As Boys When It Comes to Math

November 23, 2013

girlsmath2Parents and teachers persist in thinking boys are simply better at math. But in the largest study of its kind, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison found no difference in the scores of boys versus girls — not even in high school.

Researchers conducted a study that looked at annual math tests required by the No Child Left Behind education law in 2002. Ten states provided enough statistical information to review test scores by gender, allowing researchers to compare the performances of more than 7 million children.

Studies 20 years ago showed girls and boys did equally well on math in elementary school, but girls fell behind in high school. But according to lead researcher Janet Hyde, “Girls have now achieved gender parity in performance on standardized math tests.”

Girls who grow up believing boys are better at math wind up avoiding harder math classes, and ultimately lose out on a lot of careers, particularly high-prestige, lucrative careers in science and technology.

But things are changing, though slowly.

Women are now earning 48% of undergraduate college degrees in math; they still lag far behind in physics and engineering. In primary and secondary school, girls have caught up, with researchers attributing that advance to increasing numbers of girls taking advanced math classes such as calculus.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

 

Advice on Beating Back-to-School Anxiety

September 15, 2013

The transition into a new school year can be a time of excitement . . . and stress. Children and adults can become anxious, irritable or depressed by this major change.

We’d like to share some tips for all ages from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services:

Kindergarten through fifth grade students:

Talk about it—Talk with your elementary age children about their excitement, stressing benefits of getting back to school such as seeing their friends again and playing sports.

Give them some control—Be firm in telling your children that they do have to go to school, but give them control over some simple choices, such as buying or bringing their lunch, or riding the bus or riding their bike to school.

Teenage Students:

Keep the lines of communication open—Teens want you to listen to their back-to-school concerns without judging them. Do everything possible to keep the lines of communication open at this critical age.

Look for patterns—A wild new hairdo? No problem. Purple hair and scary new friends and a drop in grades? This may be cause for worry.

Adult Students:

Focus on your goals—Remind yourself why you are going back to school (better job, more money, etc.).

Remember that you’re not alone—Remind yourself that other “non-traditional students” have made it through this, and that it’s normal to be a little anxious or fearful.

If your child continues to be anxious, distracted, struggling at school or exhibiting poor behavior, Dr. Jane Stewart and the Optiminds staff may be able to help. We will consult with you and your child to evaluate and identify problem areas or learning disorders that may be the source of the problem. We’ll design a customized program for improving your student’s cognitive skills, concentration, reading and other areas we have identified.

Dr. Stewart realizes that often parents need help too.  Optiminds offers parent coaching and parenting programs designed to instruct parents on how to handle their child’s behavioral or educational issues.  Giving parents the tools they need to make positive strides in their relationships as well as tools to steer their child in positive directions.

Call us today at (248) 496-0150 for an Initial Consultation or email Dr. Stewart at: jstewart@optimindsct.com.. Learn more about Optiminds’ customized tutoring programs by visiting the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

Study Tips to Take the Stress Out of School

August 15, 2013

The new school year is just over a month away. If you are starting college or high school, you will be dealing with a totally new environment, a load of classes and mountains of homework that could be overwhelming if you don’t have a plan for dealing with it.

One of the biggest stressors is not having enough time to do everything, which can dramatically affect your ability to process what you learn in class.

Here are some practical study tips from Anne Crossman, author of Study Smart, Study Less for students of all ages:

  • Learn to manage your time. Map out a daily schedule, including school, sports or music practice, study time and free time.
  • Determine what time of day is your best in terms of studying, block it out and commit to it. Maybe your best time is right after school, or maybe you need a break first before you can hit the books again. Best not to put study off until it’s late and you are getting tired.
  • Create a study environment that is most efficient for you. Turn off your phone, don’t get on the Internet or get involved in social networking if it’s your designated study time. Turn off television and music. Contrary to what most students think, the brain works faster if it does not have to block out noise or images. Don’t study on your bed, either; your brain is programmed for sleeping and relaxing there.
  • As soon as you can after a class or lecture, find a quiet place where you can rewrite your notes and structure them in a way that makes sense to you.

If you feel that learning is still a struggle, consider enrolling in an Optiminds’ brain fitness program. We will customize a program for your specific needs that is designed to strengthen nerve cells and stimulate targeted areas of the brain to improve your cognitive and concentration skills.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ customized tutoring programs by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

Optiminds Offers Coaching to Prepare for College Athletic Scholarship Programs

April 5, 2013

NCAA1If you are a high school athlete and you think you are good enough for a college scholarship offer, your grades will just as important as your athletic abilities. College coaches want to recruit well-rounded athletes who excel on and off the playing field.

If you want to play in a NCAA Division I or II school, you must have a 2.0 GPA (or better) in your core courses. The higher your GPA, the better. College coaches want to recruit athletes who will be successful in the college classroom.

Your scores on the standardized tests (SAT and/or ACT) are also important. Standardized test scores, taken in conjunction with your high school grades, are used to predict your academic success in college.

Optiminds coaching sessions can help you ensure that your grades are in top shape. One of our main areas of focus is on helping students qualify for college scholarships, and that includes NCAA scholarships. Our programs are designed to follow NCAA eligibility rules and NCAA Clearinghouse guidelines.

Here are some suggestions if an NCAA scholarship is on your agenda:

  • Consider taking one or more advanced placement courses if you high school offers them. This shows your dedication to taking a challenging high school curriculum.
  • Doing volunteer work and participating in extracurricular activities other than your sport shows that you’re responsible enough to handle the pressures of school and your sport, while still taking part in other activities.
  • Consider taking the SAT in your sophomore year. This gives you time to see which areas you need to improve on so you can get a good score later. Without good grades, some schools will not even consider you for an athletic scholarship.

You can access and print your high school’s List of NCAA Courses at: www.eligibilitycenter.org.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ customized tutoring programs by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at: optimindsct.com.

Tutoring Can Help Foster a Love of Reading

February 22, 2013

boysread2Helping a child become a reader is one of the greatest gifts that an adult can give, a gift that continues to pay dividends throughout life. Children who acquire strong reading skills at an early age often enjoy a more successful academic experience.

But getting children to read is becoming more difficult with the proliferation of movies, television shows, computer games, sports and after school activities vying for kids’ attention today.

Instilling a love of reading comes as much from reading to your children when they are very young as from your child’s own confidence in his or her reading skills. If you feel that your child may need help with their reading skills, tutoring is a great way to support and cultivate a love of reading. And remember, reading skills can be improved at any age.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds specializes in tutoring reading at all levels. Dr. Stewart and her staff will develop a customized, results-oriented reading program tailored to your child’s needs. One-on-one instruction in a comfortable atmosphere will quickly help improve your child’s reading performance, comprehension and vocabulary. With newfound confidence in their reading abilities, your child will be well on their way to becoming an avid reader.

Dr. Jane Stewart at Optiminds has earned a reputation for helping to improve the study, reading, math and cognitive skills of students of all ages. Learn more about Optiminds’ customized tutoring programs by calling Dr. Stewart today at (248) 496-0150 or email her at: jstewart@optimindsct.com. And be sure to visit the Optiminds website at www.optimindsct.com.


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